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AV Lifestyle Magazine

 

Fall has arrived…

Once again, the frantic rushing, preparations and joy of Christmas and the holidays is over. Suddenly we find ourselves at the end of one year, with all its attendant joys, trials and triumphs passed, and a new year, with all its hope, promise and opportunity for new beginnings, rapidly approaching.

Since every new year offers a fresh start and multiple opportunities for change, this January issue of LIFESTYLE Magazine is generally themed a time for new beginnings and, more specifically, how to rejuvenate and renew yourself.

Keeping that in mind, staff writer Tina Forde, with photographs by staff photographer, Bernard Kane, visit the Powerhouse Gym in Lancaster and talk with teacher Chris Mayer, who teaches the ancient discipline of yoga. Mayer teaches the Iyengar method of yoga, named after the originator, B.K.S. Iyengar of India, who has developed a gentle form of the discipline that is accessible to all body types and can be adapted for the elderly and disabled.

Additionally, Special Sections Editor Jana Thorson, with photographs by staff photographer, Kelly Lacefield, talk with Elana Essers, a working mother who owns and operates a Pilates studio in Lancaster. Pilates, one of the most popular exercise regimens today, and practiced by many celebrities and athletes, offers a ‘no-impact, full-body workout.’

Rich Breault, contributing editor and senior staff writer, examines reflexology, a holistic, healing therapy that complements modern medicine. He talks with reflexologist Debra Basham of Herbal Wisdom Wellness Center in Lancaster who explains that pressure applied on specific parts of the hands, feet and ears can produce therapeutic effects on other parts of the body. Also, in their story called “The Healing Body,” Rich and his photographer wife, Liz, examine the ancient Chinese practice of acupuncture and talk with Marina McNutt of Acton Acupuncture, a registered nurse with a master’s degree in oriental medicine.

Additional health-oriented features include: the importance of stretching before and after a workout, by staff writer Lindsay Hymas; the hot, new dance craze Zumba by staff writer Liane Roth; tips on ‘The work workout,’ how to get fit at the office; and the inspiring story of longtime AV resident and funeral director Jim Mumaw, whose 150-pound wight loss in one year gave him a new lease on life.

Other features in this January issue include staff writer Tina Forde’s story on a financial health checklist—what to look at and how to get financially healthy for the new year; Rich Breault’s story called New beginnings, a mother’s road to a home and stability; staff writer Gabriela Garay-Diaz’ story on the Girl Scouts’ annual Cookie Rally, which will kick off 95 years of sales for the Girl Scouts USA; staff writer Vern Lawson examines how the Railroad and Homestead Act opened up the Valley for 19th-century settlers in his Hometown History feature; Rich and Liz Breault visit the Orange Empire Railway Museum, a place that fulfills dreams of kids of all ages in Out & About; and in their story, “A Stylist’s Evolution,” the Breaults visit and talk with Donna Weil, a distinguished artist who loves change and whose talent has transformed through the decades and revolved through various mediums.

Additionally, staff writer Vern Lawson examines the origins of probably one of the most famous songs ever written—and sung by just about all of us every year at midnight on Dec. 31—“Auld Lang Syne.”

These are just a few of the stories featured in this exciting and informative January 2008 issue of LIFESTYLE magazine. We hope you’ll join us for new beginnings as we begin this bright and hopeful new year.TextIt’s October, the 10th month of the year in our modern calendar, but the eighth month in the early Roman calendar (hence the name “Octo,” or eight). There’s a definite and palpable change in the Antelope Valley air, and the angle of late-afternoon sunlight has lengthened as the stifling hot days of summer grow shorter and cooler and the evenings arrive more quickly.

The long and lazy days of summer are now just a memory, as are the fun-filled days of the Antelope Valley Fair. Students are firmly entrenched at school, and their parents are solidly working at their regular schedules. It won’t be long, however, until pint-sized pirates, princesses, goblins, witches, and Spidermen will be trick-or-treating through our streets on Halloween, undoubtedly the scariest evening of the year.

Veteran’s Day will soon be here, when we pause to honor and pay tribute to the former and current military heroes of this great country, and it will soon be followed by that most American of holidays, Thanksgiving.

And, with all that tradition and history in mind, we have devoted this October issue of LIFESTYLE to the most fascinating history of Old California, including a look at those truly California entities, the California missions, founded by Franciscan Father Junípero Serra and other early padres that stretch from San Diego in the south up into northern California.

Mission San Juan Capistrano, the seventh of the California missions established, is 238 years old but has undergone continuing conservation and preservation work to keep its history alive and well for the many visitors who flock there. Special sections editor Karen Maeshiro, in “Polishing the ‘Jewel of the Missions,’” provides an update on the projects performed, including the restoration of a two-centuries-old painting depicting Jesus’ Crucifixion that had been hidden behind another painting for 40 years.

This issue of LIFESTYLE also explores the lives and places of famous Old California figures who have an Antelope Valley connection, including notorious bandit Tiburcio Vasquez, who is remembered today in the names of a rock formation, the county park that surrounds it and a nearby high school.

Also recalled is Miguel Leonis, a truly larger-than-life, 6-foot-4 rancher known as “the Big Basque” who controlled thousands of acres of Southern California in the 1870s and 1880s, including in present-day Leona Valley, which was named after him. He and his wife, the daughter of a Chumash chief, lived in a two-story adobe house that still exists today as the Leonis Adobe Museum in Calabasas, which is reviewed in “Ranch life in Old California.”

But the state’s history isn’t our only concern in this October issue. Local history is explored by historian Norma Gurba, who writes about Dr. Philip (Phil) James Vogel, an early Mojave doctor who became a world-famous neurosurgeon.

And reporter Julie Drake, in her Good Kids feature story “Budding songwriter has three CDs under her belt” with accompanying photographs by Christina Ramos, talks with 9-year-old Amanda Sirota, who has written and recorded CDs with her dad.

We additionally have all our regular columns, such as Horse Tales, Hometown History, A Taste for Wine, Collector’s Corner, and Kovel’s Antique Forum. So please join us.

CherieBryant
Cherie Bryant
Antelope Valley Press
Vice President & General Manager

 

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